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the task here in washington is going to be very difficult to convince her u.s. government to change the way it has done business for 30 years because a lot of the strategic and current imperatives drive our security. how do you actually play the right role of engaging your? it's not naƏvely giving money to liberal groups and things like this are not having a strategy. i do believe that this is a significant test inside of egypt. it's an encouraging sign, and i think, this is my prediction and were rob and others may disagree, is that it's going to force islamist political parties at least elements of the to change their ideology, if the system remains open and that's the big if, if there's a big debate i don't see it going backwards in terms of the diversity we see in egypt as large as it is it's hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> okay, we are going to move to our closing remarks and we're going to go in reverse order, so bret, you can have two minutes to make a final plea. >> yeah, in 1979 jean kirkpatrick wrote an influential article, dictatorships and double standards, in w
with statistics that the u.s. spends significantly more percentage of gnp on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. what i was surprised to hear at a recent conference was exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups for seniors and people with disabilities or things like this. which raises the question in my mind would it be better for us to rebalance our spending in this direction to provide better quality by providing support services that allow people to stay in their homes functioning well instead of institutionalizing them which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens because it makes no sense. we know it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much kind of support structure is a very large one. i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized in long-term care and other settings are there because they have multiple dependencies that are difficult to treat outside. most
. working with u.s. save football and pop warner, the result is going to be extremely important to the future of the game but the other thing is on the education peace, what we've found is teaching the parents, teaching the parents is critical. when i started we have all kinds of parents say 9 know my kid, he can go back in the game, and use save this child cannot go back in the game. parents are now aware and not making those decisions. the other piece of it is on coach's training we need to really get the coaches out there to teach other coaches. we can hand anybody in our organization but we need to do a better job with the whole nation about going to places where there isn't a national structure. >> i want to bring brooke de lench. tell us about your web site. do you working with the nfl? >> yes, we are actually helping with the nfl evolution so each day you see some of the tips from the team which i and the publisher in that fight, i am also the author of home team advantage:the critical role of mothers in youth sports and i have a great new hat, a producer of a documentary
be standing or sitting with us on u.s. soil receiving this honor as a member of the burmese parliament. back then we thought about granting the metal and extension which may have been the first time a person would have received in the history of the metal the congressional gold medal while in detention. who would have imagined this change was possible. who would have thought that this could happen. let me tell you one who believed it could come true, aung san suu kyi herself. she might be too humble to admit it but i know she always thought this moment would be possible, not because she worries about awards or honors. let me tell you she certainly does not. she believed it because she and the burmese people always believed change was possible. they hoped, as a new change must come to their country. she knew the burmese people, human rights and most importantly deserved democratic governance. shea stoked the flames in a peaceful way for a lasting change even among those already in a position of power. her efforts have helped lead us to where we are today. there has been a lot of advancement a
signal] >> in terms of what the u.s. could have dope, there were a number of opportunities where it could have said something. for example, when judges pulled out of oversight, when international monitors hadn't been sent, we could have raised concerns about the legitimacy of the process. we could used the relationship that the president at least thinks he has with president morsi to say to him the situation you're creating in egypt is very unstable, we could have made a statement about the purpose of constitutions being consensual documents for the rules of the game. that's what legislation is supposed to do. i mean, these are things that we could have said. now, i have to also say that, um, you know, would it have mattered, you know? that's really the question. well, it depends. on one hand the brotherhood i see is a very stubborn, dedicated, regimented organization. i could see them very well saying, excuse me, you're interfering, which is what they said to erdogan last year, but on the other hand by not saying anything, the signal that we've sent is that we have some sort of arrangeme
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5